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Built Review
28mm
Chaos Hive Bringer
Grim Skull Miniatures Chaos Hive Bringer
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by: Andras [ SPONGYA ]

The resin is very well cast; there is practically no flash, and no distortion at all- nothing is warped, apart from Typhus himself, of course. (It is not unusual to receive thinner resin parts that are bent even from large, reputable companies; Grim Skull, so far has always provided top notch quality resin.)


The detail is pretty astonishing; the rents and gaps on the armor, the demonic, leering face on shoulder pad, the bells, the cracked, broken hoof of the terminator armor... wherever you look there is something interesting going on.


The figure comes with a base which is similarly well detailed with the assortment of maggots, skulls and horns. If you look closely, you will even find the skeleton of a man slouched by the base of the large horn.


The really cool part- at least I found it fascinating- is that one of Typhus’ hands is bare… you actually get to see the skin of a corrupted daemon prince under the armor.


The assembly is a breeze; you have to attach the arms, the shoulder pads and the weapon(s). If you elect to use the sickles, the position of arms is less than important. With the scythe, you have to be very careful to make sure the arms are in the correct position. I used a slower setting, gel CA glue, which allowed me to adjust the positions.


As with most figures, painting is the difficult part- and I do admit I’m not an excellent figure painter by any means. (My main interest is armor models).


I found that glazes are great to produce an uneven, dirty and grimy looking surface -perfect for the corrupt Death Guard. Previously, with Mortarion, I used glazes over black primer; this time I decided to use a similar approach over white primer. I used several shades of brown and green glazes (prepared using Lahman medium and acrylic paints) to give the armor a stained, corroded look. The parts of the armor I wanted to appear bronze received a green base; I chose two green colors that are close to the color of oxidized bronze. Later on I realised I should use a dark, metallic tin color, and layer bronze and oxidised bronze colors onto it.


The blisters and pustules were painted with a yellowish/pinkish color, and received several orangish/reddish glazes; it managed to convey the inflamed, blistered, sick skin.
SUMMARY
Highs: Great looking alternative for WH40K players (or painters). Amazing detail.
Lows: Somewhat high price
Verdict: Recommended
Percentage Rating
95%
  Scale: 28mm
  Mfg. ID: 253432791446
  Suggested Retail: $29
  Related Link: 
  PUBLISHED: Nov 19, 2018
NETWORK-WIDE AVERAGE RATINGS
  THIS REVIEWER: 84.93%
  MAKER/PUBLISHER: 91.67%

About Andras (spongya)
FROM: BUDAPEST, HUNGARY

I am a biologist by trade, and as a hobby I've been building scale models for the last twenty years. Recently I started to write reviews of the models I bought. These reviews are written from the point of view of an average model builder; hence the focus is on quality of the model, how easy it is to...

Copyright ©2018 text by Andras [ SPONGYA ]. Images also by copyright holder unless otherwise noted. Opinions expressed are those of the author(s) and not necessarily those of ModelGeek. All rights reserved.



Comments

That is a ton of detail in a figure! Your colors are interesting - both aesthetically pleasing and menacing.
NOV 19, 2018 - 03:20 PM
Thank you... Yes, the detail is astonishing, really. I can't really do justice to the figure, but I thought it would be something others might be interested, too. (I'm not a WH40K player, but I do paint the odd figure here and there.) The colors are layers upon layers of greens and browns applied as glazes. It creates a nice, uneven, discolored surface. I am trying to figure out a way to use it in armor modelling.
NOV 19, 2018 - 10:21 PM
   

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