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Anime / Manga / Gundam
Going Japanese? Discuss all forms of Anime, Manga or Gundam here.
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My First One of These
95bravo
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Kansas, United States
Joined: November 18, 2003
KitMaker: 2,242 posts
ModelGeek: 572 posts
Posted: Friday, December 26, 2008 - 07:28 AM UTC
This was the first I've ever done of these. I built this vignette as a gift for a friend of my oldest son. It was a Bandai kit and the colonial marines I'm not sure who they came from. I was pretty happy how it came out. I had some issues with the decals and micro-sol. As you can see some of them silvered. I guess maybe I didn't have enough clear gloss shot onto those spots. I dunno. Yet, despite that, I was sort of pleased. I didn't have my tri-pod, so I couldn't get some good detail shots. Sorry.










Warning
Joined: August 15, 2008
KitMaker: 107 posts
ModelGeek: 15 posts
Posted: Saturday, December 27, 2008 - 01:05 AM UTC
Nice to see a Z'gok out of the water, and a great first go at a Gundam kit.

Looking forward to more. May I reccomend a Hygog or Dom Tropen?

tylusfaust
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New Jersey, United States
Joined: December 18, 2005
KitMaker: 371 posts
ModelGeek: 25 posts
Posted: Monday, December 29, 2008 - 04:47 AM UTC
Wow, this is pretty cool. What kit is this? I'm interested in getting one but have no idea as to production company or name.
slodder
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North Carolina, United States
Joined: February 22, 2002
KitMaker: 11,718 posts
ModelGeek: 3,131 posts
Posted: Monday, December 29, 2008 - 06:19 AM UTC
I think it came out really well.
I like the extra elevation in the base. It gives the whole project nice vertical volume.
Paint scheme is great too.
95bravo
_VISITCOMMUNITY
Kansas, United States
Joined: November 18, 2003
KitMaker: 2,242 posts
ModelGeek: 572 posts
Posted: Monday, December 29, 2008 - 07:26 AM UTC

Quoted Text

Nice to see a Z'gok out of the water, and a great first go at a Gundam kit.

Looking forward to more. May I reccomend a Hygog or Dom Tropen?




Yeah, after I presented it to the person I built it for, he told me that it was an underwater Gundam. I didn't know. I'm glad that you all liked it and thank you for the kind comments. Scott I like how the base turned out as well. It kept the focus on the vignette and, best of all, you didn't need to lay your head on the table to look at it up close.
Warning
Joined: August 15, 2008
KitMaker: 107 posts
ModelGeek: 15 posts
Posted: Tuesday, December 30, 2008 - 12:48 AM UTC

Quoted Text


What kit is this? I'm interested in getting one but have no idea as to production company or name.



It's a Bandai Gundam HGUC (High Grade Universal Century) 1/144th scale ZGok.

The line of Bandai Gundam HGUC kits is long and, at times, spectacular. You can check them all out here...

http://www.hlj.com/hljlist2/?word2=&series2=High+Grade+Universal+Century&scale2=All&Dis=2&GenreCode=Gun&MacroType=HGrd&Maker1=BAN

...And see more detail here...

http://dalong.net/

Click HGUC at the top, or MG (Master Grade) if you're feeling brave, or PG (Perfect Grade) if you have a large ammount of cash.

95bravo
_VISITCOMMUNITY
Kansas, United States
Joined: November 18, 2003
KitMaker: 2,242 posts
ModelGeek: 572 posts
Posted: Tuesday, December 30, 2008 - 07:46 AM UTC
I have , perhaps, a delicate question to ask regarding these. In Asia, are these considered more along the line of toys rather than static models? The friend of my son is from China and the first thing he did when I presented it to him (much to my horror) was crank around on the legs and arms to see if they would move!
Warning
Joined: August 15, 2008
KitMaker: 107 posts
ModelGeek: 15 posts
Posted: Tuesday, December 30, 2008 - 03:28 PM UTC

Quoted Text


In Asia, are these considered more along the line of toys rather than static models?



All gundams are, at heart, toys. The HGs, MGs and even PGs are all snap fit and designed to be posable. This means that they cater for a very large audience as there are a number of ways that they can be finished.

1. Snapped / glued and stickered.
2. Snapped / glued and painted with markers (basically painting pens used to touch up details).
3. Glued and painted in a fixed pose with the movable joints fixed in place.
4. Glued and painted, but still fully posable.

Most kids in japan and some fans of the series itself will just go with stage 1 or 2 only. Serious kit builders will often go through stage 1 to finalise a pose for stage 3. Stage 4 is, of course, the hardest to accomplish as it requires all parts to be painted in the event that a certain portion of the kit becomes visable when the pose is changed. Stage 4 is usually used on kits that will see publication or display as the final pose will be played around with as the display or photography requires.

Let me give you some links to a few YouTube videos that demonstrate different finish levels.

Bandai MG RX-78 NT-1 Alex & MS-18E Kämpfer Tutorial 1/9

Bandai HG Dunbine Leprechaun Tutorial 1/6

Bandai MG AMX-004 Qubeley Tutorial 1/2

Bandai MG MSM-04 Acguy + Diorama Tutorial 1/6

Bandai MG MS-05 Zaku I Tutorial 1/2

Bandai MG RX-178 Gundam Mk-II Titans Ver. Tutorial 1/2

Bandai MG Gundam RX78-2 Ver. Ka Tutorial 1/2

Bandai MG MSM-07 Z'Gok + Diorama Tutorial 1/2

Baindai MG MS-09RS Char's Rick Dom Tutorial 1/2

Bandai MG MS-07B-3 Gouf Tutorial 1/2

That's about 6 hours of Gundam kit building videos!

As you can see, some are fixed, some are free to move and some serious modellers get their hands dirty on what are generally reguarded as toys is most other circles. They really straddle the line. Of course kids will always try to twist them around, but that's kids. I hope no damage was done...

Note: A word of caution on the subject of Bandai plastic.

While it is nicely molded and very high quality stuff, parts that are under tension, i.e. that have been pressed hard to fit in certain areas and then left snap fitted or glued in place, can crack when treated with mineral or similar thinners. On more than one occasion with my kits, a part that had been undercoated and painted would crack under an oil wash because it had been forced into place and glued. Basically it was under too much tension and when the thinner attacked it, the part gave way.

I would suggest that anyone wanting to take a Bandai Gundam kit, or indeed any Bandai kit to a high level of finish by applying pin washes and pigment fixers, make sure that during the construction stages, any parts requiring force to be fixed in place are modifies to fit with as little force as possible. This really applies when building MG and PG kits as the number of parts increases drammatically and some do require a certain ammount of pressure. Of course, certain parts can be painted off the model and later pressed into place, but some cannot.