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Science Fiction: Star Wars
Discuss Star Wars kits until you fall into the Sarlac pit.
Hosted by Rowan Baylis
Painting & Weathering Bandai Kits
Lakota
#123
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New Mexico, United States
Joined: November 17, 2008
KitMaker: 1,036 posts
ModelGeek: 111 posts
Posted: Sunday, October 20, 2019 - 05:35 AM UTC
Howdy Y'all
It seems I've heard somewhere that Bandai plastic used in the Star War kits does not respond well to weathering, solvents and thinners. I've looked around on the forums for more info but haven't found any more info. Does anybody know about this problem?
I would like to do pin washes and dot washes with oils and paint thinner but am hesitant to do so. I'm currently building the tiny AT-M6 kits, would like to form a battle line on the planet Crait. Any info is much appreciated.
Thank you and take care,
Don "Lakota"
Trisaw
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California, United States
Joined: December 24, 2002
KitMaker: 3,962 posts
ModelGeek: 924 posts
Posted: Sunday, October 20, 2019 - 06:27 AM UTC
From the Youtube videos that I've seen, no there doesn't appear to be any issues with weathering Bandai kits. However, most of the Star Wars kits weathered on Youtube have been done with airbrushes though so I'm not 100% sure there isn't any weathering issues.
brekinapez
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Georgia, United States
Joined: July 26, 2013
KitMaker: 1,903 posts
ModelGeek: 14 posts
Posted: Sunday, October 20, 2019 - 06:43 AM UTC
I found trying to weather my B-wing a bit of a pain. The smooth, shiny plastic doesn't seem to like letting things bite into it; paints I had no problems with spraying onto a Tamiya or Dragon kit seemed to come off the Bandai plastic much more readily.

My next kit will end with me building it up and then gloss coating the main assemblies and painting/weathering on top of the gloss coat. After all that is done I'll knock the shine down with a matte or satin.

I think the kits are great but the high sheen to the plastic seems to make it hard to get paints to adhere and makes the whole thing look like a very sophisticated Lego kit. It works great for the Gundam/giant robot stuff but not so much for the Star Wars line.
Tank1812
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North Carolina, United States
Joined: April 29, 2014
KitMaker: 665 posts
ModelGeek: 3 posts
Posted: Sunday, October 20, 2019 - 07:00 AM UTC
The issue is the weathering (enamel thinners etc) can weaken the plastic, usually melting/destroying the joints. In some cases changing the plastic color. A stormtroopers boot from white to a yellowish off white. Mild weathering solutions are ok.
Lakota
#123
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New Mexico, United States
Joined: November 17, 2008
KitMaker: 1,036 posts
ModelGeek: 111 posts
Posted: Sunday, October 20, 2019 - 07:02 AM UTC
Thanks Peter and Shell,
I noticed the plastic might not hold the paint well. I soaked the parts in soap and water but the plastic was still shiny and slick. Next I'll try primer. The other models I've seen that produce good results use Vallejo paints so that's what I'll use after the primer.
I'm still worried about the oil and thinner weathering I plan on doing.
Take care,
Don "Lakota"
Dixon66
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New Hampshire, United States
Joined: December 12, 2002
KitMaker: 984 posts
ModelGeek: 497 posts
Posted: Sunday, October 20, 2019 - 07:34 AM UTC
From my experience so far with several Bandai SW kits. I have used oils with a turpenoid thinner without any effect on the plastic, but I have built each one as a glue kit and not as a snap, all push-fit joints were hit with Tamiya extra thin before being pushed together, seams were glued as well.

Also, Mr. Color 1500 was used as primer after assembly and no external plastic was left unpainted. I would think sealing with the primer was the true difference.
Klaus-Adler
Staff MemberCampaigns Administrator
MODELGEEK
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Scotland, United Kingdom
Joined: June 08, 2015
KitMaker: 1,088 posts
ModelGeek: 278 posts
Posted: Sunday, October 20, 2019 - 11:09 PM UTC
my experience is that using thinners and humbrol paints to create washes and it made some of the plast6 very brittle, particularly around joints. I would suggest you should use several coats of clear varnish, I use tamiya spray can clear gloss and clear Matt vanishes.
Lakota
#123
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New Mexico, United States
Joined: November 17, 2008
KitMaker: 1,036 posts
ModelGeek: 111 posts
Posted: Monday, October 21, 2019 - 11:43 PM UTC
Thanks guys,
I just ordered a rattle can of Vallejo Gloss and Satin yesterday. I just realized this morning I probably should have ordered Matte instead of Satin. Live and learn...
I will seal everything with the gloss before using oils and thinner for weathering. I glued most of the joints with Tamiya thin cement when assembling so I hope they are secured.
I used Tamiya primer and it seems that I made the right choice there. All the fine detail has remained intact and the primer adhered beautifully.
Take care,
Don "Lakota"
ttwells
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New York, United States
Joined: June 03, 2006
KitMaker: 237 posts
ModelGeek: 29 posts
Posted: Thursday, October 24, 2019 - 10:25 AM UTC
I have built several Star Wars kits from Bandai - had an issue with the A-Wing - weathering wash "split" the cowling behind glass. It was an enamel wash. Next models were built/painted using Vallejo paints then weathered with Mig, Tamiya and AK washes over them. The acrylic paints buffer the plastic, but watch the joints. Vallejo and Citadel make nice weathering mediums that I have used w/o issue on these kits. I usually prime with Tamiya fine white or grey spray primers - never had an issue with them.
MLD
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Vermont, United States
Joined: July 21, 2002
KitMaker: 3,474 posts
ModelGeek: 782 posts
Posted: Thursday, October 24, 2019 - 11:58 AM UTC
Coming late to the party, but yes. My usual regime of oil based weathering products caused the wing hinges in the Tie Striker to split.
Since then I switched to acrylic weathering on them and have no problems.