login   |    register
Anime / Manga / Gundam: Gundam
Discuss all topics on Gundam here.
Painting a Gundam...
old-dragon
_VISITCOMMUNITY
Illinois, United States
Joined: August 30, 2005
KitMaker: 3,289 posts
ModelGeek: 857 posts
Posted: Wednesday, January 10, 2007 - 08:12 AM UTC
I've never build a gundam before, so I'm new at this. My question is can I paint my model without having issues with arm/leg mobility? The oob colors are "ok" but I'd like to make it my own colors. Fwiw, I have the 1/100 MSM-07 Z'gok.
Trisaw
_VISITCOMMUNITY
California, United States
Joined: December 24, 2002
KitMaker: 4,105 posts
ModelGeek: 933 posts
Posted: Wednesday, January 10, 2007 - 09:54 AM UTC
The simple answer is, "Yes."

Gundams are joined by rubber polycaps that do not require painting, IF you don't paint the polycap. Many Gundam modelers paint the parts before assembly.
slodder
_VISITCOMMUNITY
North Carolina, United States
Joined: February 22, 2002
KitMaker: 11,718 posts
ModelGeek: 3,131 posts
Posted: Wednesday, January 10, 2007 - 04:03 PM UTC
Can you tell us if there is any problem with the paint gunking up the joint. Similar to painting a window shut. Do you have to spray a thinner paint?

Also what about after it dries will the motion scrape away the paint?

I did some searching on www.fichtenfoo.com (a great Gundam site) and found more posts backing up what Peter said about painting before assembly. So condiser that first, it sound like the way to go.
Trisaw
_VISITCOMMUNITY
California, United States
Joined: December 24, 2002
KitMaker: 4,105 posts
ModelGeek: 933 posts
Posted: Wednesday, January 10, 2007 - 10:38 PM UTC
There are generally two ways to paint Gundams before assembly.

One is fast and easy at the expense of work later; the other is slower, more complex, but you get a totally finished product.

The fast and easy approach is to cut the sprues according to color, spray them that color, then cut off the pieces, sand down the sprue marks, touch-up with paint, and assemble. The disadvantage of this is that once cut, you have to file down and then touch up all those sprue marks by hand or by spray on pieces that have already been painted. The advantage of this is that the pieces are all together and you can hold the sprue to spray at all angles and give all pieces an even coat.

The slow and more complex method is to cut the pieces, sand down the sprue marks, mount on sticks, mount the sticks on a styrofoam base,, spray paint, and then assemble. FichtenFoo uses this approach as does many other expert Gundam builders because the benefit is that once the sprue marks are removed, one never has to repaint the pieces again. The disadvantage is that once on sitcks, you have to ensure that you cover all areas of the pieces evenly. Instead of spraying all pieces on a sprue like one mass, you have to treat and spray the mounted pieces individually.

Then there are two ways to paint Gundams AFTER assembly. Some modelers do this, most don't.

One is to assemble everything naked like a tank and then mask off the colors and spray. This is a really tricky and time-consuming process, but some people swear by it. Using this approach may risk getting paint into the joints though. One can also handbrush too; however due to the Gundam's smooth skin doesn't look good when it's handbrushed.

The other method (and not many use this at all), is to use Gundam Markers, which are essentially big "highlighter pens" with paint inside them. You're supposed to "highlight coat" all pieces with the pen and literally paint them like the Gundam is some sort of coloring book. It's just another form of handbrushing per say and the results don't look very good from the ones I've seen because the coat of paint is either too thick or two thin.
Dixon66
_VISITCOMMUNITY
New Hampshire, United States
Joined: December 12, 2002
KitMaker: 1,500 posts
ModelGeek: 589 posts
Posted: Wednesday, January 10, 2007 - 11:52 PM UTC
There is another method as well. This method works best on the older design kits (at least for me). Some of the oldest kits require that the upper arm or leg get "trapped" inside of the rest of the limb. I will paint the built subassemblies of an arm (forearm, upper arm, etc.) chest or leg and paint those using the polycaps and old sprues as my handles, then put those together. Also these older kits are usually not broken down on panel lines requiring that the seams be cleaned up prior to painting.

The neweset kits are great, the Master Grades especially. Some of these have a complete endo-skeleton that gets covered by slipping the armor up the limb. No seam lines or anything getting in the way of paint by Peter's second prior to assembly method.

HTH,
Dave S.
old-dragon
_VISITCOMMUNITY
Illinois, United States
Joined: August 30, 2005
KitMaker: 3,289 posts
ModelGeek: 857 posts
Posted: Friday, January 12, 2007 - 08:18 AM UTC
Thanks guys! I'd go for the total removal of pieces, prep and then paint with the AB.
One thing I dislike already is the "stickers" that came with the kit...half stickers and half dry transfers. English destructions would be nice only to read the stories/part descriptions in the manual...I can wing it without it though.
Did a web search last night and found out by accident that my guy is a "bad guy"...here I thought it was one of the good guys...oh well, I lean heavily towards the axis side when I do my armor models, so this fits right in...guess my daughter was right when she said "he doesn't look like a good robot daddy".{must've been the pincher claws}