login   |    register

1350
Building the "Perfect Storm"

When the styrene joints are sufficiently dry, I remove the part from the model for painting. To remove the part do not pull it away, but use tipped pliers to pick at the Maskol globs one by one. It seemed easier from me to attach the top railing only now.







Another prominent sub-assembly is a big basket holding net/line floaters it is positioned on the port side of the weather deck, right aft of the flying deck. This little sucker is only about 10mm tall, but took me almost 2 hours to make.







On to build the outriggers...They turn out to be the nastiest part of the build so far: 5 beams and 5 bracing canít be that hard to build! Well, if it wasnít for their curved shape...Ok, here is the start;





This task was enough to make me completely mad, and I didnít like the result one bit, so I turned to weathering and dry brushing the boat!



About the Author

About Guido Hopp (Tailor)
FROM: NORDRHEIN-WESTFALEN, GERMANY

Too old to be young. Too young to be old. Happily married, one son. Living just North of the German Ruhr area . Trying to concentrate on ship models, but having way too many soft spots for other fields of interest. Please remember: Vee Jermans hef no sense of humor (at least Dave of WEM says so) ...


Comments

This is exactly the reason why I check these kind of places day after day after day, because sometimes I let my jaw drop a bit at the sight of something truly original and greatly done like your work Guido -and what a great step by step too!
MAR 10, 2010 - 07:48 AM
Hi Guido! Could you describe your low-light photo techniques? --Karl
MAR 10, 2010 - 10:57 AM
Thank you for your praise, gentlemen! It means a lot to get so many kind words from such an elect group of modelers. The low light technique is really quite simple. You switch of all light and illuminate your model with a hand-held torch/ flash light. Of cause you need a tripod for your camera. Your camera will decide for you when it has collected enough light to close the shutter. You can use colored transparent paper to achieve effects like sunrise/-set. The ďartĒ is to crop the pictures to their maximum effect. Take your time. Experiment a bit. Cheers, Guido
MAR 11, 2010 - 03:23 AM
Still beautiful - I hope you bring it for the weekend - I would like to see it in real Cheers/Jan
MAR 11, 2010 - 04:08 AM
Of cause, I'll be taking her with me to Luebeck! Guido
MAR 11, 2010 - 04:33 AM
It looks great in real life too Cheers - or ...Haaarrrrg! /Jan
MAR 15, 2010 - 01:30 AM
Hallo Guido I had the privilege of seeing it born from plain Evergreen sheet and Styrofoam, with bits of PE from the spare box, and some brass masts... this is the proof that you can make a stunning diorama, a excellent ship (boat in this particular case) with a low budget, and still, be a show stopper! Thank you once again for all your effort in making this a great place to learn, enjoy and have fun with our hobby! Tschuss, Rui
MAR 16, 2010 - 07:19 AM
There's no other feeling like it, the heat of the angle poise on your neck, Beethoven on the MP3, and a wealth of models to build - G'dammit you're a model ship builder! - start theme music....... Another masterclass, Guido, well done, and bring him to Telford. Peter F
MAR 16, 2010 - 08:30 PM
Nice interpretation of the "swordfish captain speech", Peter! Cheers, Guido
MAR 16, 2010 - 08:42 PM
I already made my comments in the Group Build, but this is so good bears giving you a second BZ. I also want to (yet again) thank all the expert modelers who take the time to record and detail their WIP for the rest of us to learn from. Cheers
MAR 20, 2010 - 06:16 AM